Artificial intelligence (AI) was the center of attention at RSNA 2017 in Chicago, and FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. got in on the fun by unveiling its new AI development initiative from its booth at McCormick Place. Bill Lacy, FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. vice president of medical informatics, spoke to us after the show about both the history behind the initiative and its bright future.

If you put a leading-edge 3D visualization platform in the hands of a fearlessly tech-forward radiologist, don’t be surprised if some real innovation emerges. That’s one lesson to be drawn from a recent cross-subspecialty adaptation of a Fujifilm Synapse® 3D component called Sector MPR. The component was designed to let abdominal radiologists render CT slices of structures and lesions in the abdomen to match their appearance on ultrasound displays. Sanjay Prabhu, MBBS, FRCR, discovered he could use this tool to visualize, in much the same way, the brains of babies who receive neuroimaging with CT or MRI.

Southwest Diagnostic Imaging (SDI), a large physician-owned practice in Phoenix, employs 130 radiologists who provide imaging services at 34 locations. Front desk employees are vital to any provider with that many moving parts, so when SDI started to experience significant workflow issues and administrative duties started consuming too much time, it was something management wanted to nip in the bud as fast as possible.

The past several years have seen the development of a de facto stealth campaign against screening mammography. “Vast Study Casts Doubts on Value of Mammograms,” the New York Times bullhorned in 2014. “Why Getting a Mammogram May Cause More Trouble Than It’s Worth,” a Prevention headline blared in 2016. “It’s Time to End Mammograms, Some Experts Say,” trumpeted Time this past December. All of this is fueled, of course, by the never-ending disputes over guidelines issued by numerous authoritative groups.

To the surprise of absolutely no one, artificial intelligence (AI) and deep learning technologies were the talk of RSNA 2017 in Chicago. More than 70 sessions were devoted to AI, and you couldn’t walk ten feet without reading or hearing the words “machine learning” or “algorithm.” Shannon Werb, vRad’s president and chief operating officer, and Dr. Benjamin Strong, vRad’s chief medical officer (CMO), sat down with ImagingBiz at RSNA to discuss their organization’s stance on these evolving technologies and what vRad and its parent company, MEDNAX, have planned for 2018 and beyond.