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James Brice
 - Plaque-Rabbit Artery
Cardiovascular Business
Revelations about the cause of MI have led researchers to seek out new ways to address coronary artery disease through imaging vulnerable plaque.
 - Vulnerable Plaque Fig. 3
Molecular Imaging

Revelations about the actual cause of myocardial infarction have led researchers to seek out new ways to diagnose, evaluate, treat and prevent coronary artery disease, specifically through imaging vulnerable plaque.

Molecular Imaging

Slowly but steadily, radiation oncologists are adopting PET and PET/CT to measure the early response of cancers to radiotherapy and other treatments. And progress has been significant.

 - Possible Parkinsonian syndrome
Molecular Imaging

SPECT and PET-based strategies have started to refine diagnosis and treatment planning for Parkinsons disease and epilepsy.

Cardiovascular Business
CT coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening for low- or intermediate-risk individuals remains a topic of great debate among providers, with strong, varied opinions about when and if to introduce the test into the patient care continuum. Despite the critics of the screening technology, new clinical data and society initiatives have resulted in steady gains of acceptance.
Health Imaging
Thoracic radiologists are at odds with one another about the benefits of image enhancement and analytical tools for low-dose CT lung cancer screening.
 - Oncology Imaging
Molecular Imaging

A new day is dawning for breast cancer diagnosis, treatment and monitoring with the help of molecular imaging.

Health Imaging
Small studies assessing the efficacy of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) to diagnose or rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) have been the staple reference standard for its adoption. But a new era of comparative-effectiveness research is unfolding as CCTA will be tested against other validated cardiac imaging modalities, in particular, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI).
Health Imaging
When a SPECT myocardial perfusion study of a patient with persistent angina produced a normal result, the attending cardiologist at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston suspected the study had missed something more serious.