You are here

Michael Walter
Editor
Michael joined TriMed in 2015 as the digital editor of RadiologyBusiness.com. He has over a decade of experience working as a writer, copy editor and manager. Michael studied journalism at the University of North Texas. He currently lives in St. Louis with his wife, daughter, and a record collection that never seems to stop growing.
 - Daniel R. Gale, MD

Daniel R. Gale, MD, and M. Elon Gale, MD, both worked in academics before they began working at Lowell General Hospital (LGH), a nonprofit community hospital in Lowell, Mass. And while the brothers both enjoyed their new practice, there was one thing they missed from the days of working with trainees: reviewing and interpreting each exam with a fellow with post-graduate training.

 - Jeff Kinlaw

In healthcare, as in life, relationships evolve over time. Take, for instance, Atlantic Radiology Associates (ARA) in Savannah, Ga., a 12-radiologist group serving hospitals throughout Georgia, South Carolina and Florida. ARA first started working with vRad, the country’s largest teleradiology provider, back in 2007, with vRad handling preliminary weekend and overnight reads for one of the group’s busiest hospitals.

 - Dennis Wiseman

Hurricane Harvey, one of the most devastating storms in U.S. history, hit Texas in August 2017, leaving entire neighborhoods underwater and doing billions of dollars in damage. On Friday, August 25, the storm was heading straight for the coastal city of Corpus Christi, Texas, until weather patterns shifted at the last minute.

 - Michael Walter

There’s been a lot of talk over the years about radiology’s “image problem.” Survey after survey shows that many patients don’t fully understand what radiology is or what a radiologist does, and in a healthcare environment increasingly focused on demonstrating value, that’s certainly a reason to be alarmed. But there’s something happening right now that could help with radiology’s image problem: more radiologists are starting to run for public office.

 - Travis Singleton-wide

The radiology job market has had its fair share of ups and downs, as one can see by simply scanning the last 15 years of data from Merritt Hawkins, a popular physician search firm. In 2003, radiology was the No. 1 most requested search assignment at Merritt Hawkins. The top of the mountain in terms of demand. That period also marked a huge increase in the supply of radiologists as both medical students and residents liked the specialty’s high quality of life as well as its potential for high earnings.

 - Michael Walter

It has become standard practice over the years for imaging providers to maintain data for at least five years, but according to an article published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology, perhaps that data should be kept indefinitely. 

 - Michael Walter

A lot of conversations about value in radiology revolve around patients. How can specialists and their practices keep patients happy? What will make them the most comfortable? These are important things to ask, of course, but a recent article published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology is a reminder that demonstrating value to referring physicians is also absolutely crucial. 

 - Greg-strowig

HIMSS 2017 was in Orlando, Fla., last month, and officials at FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. say it was yet another hugely successful show for the company.

Greg Strowig, vice president of the company’s TeraMedica Division, says the company looks forward to HIMSS each and every year. 

 - Michael Walter

Leaders in imaging, and all other healthcare specialties, should pay close attention to survey results published by Black Book Market Research earlier this month. The numbers raise red flags about the current state of technology in healthcare, and there are some important lessons to be learned.

 - Michael Walter

By attempting to shatter the status quo and shift toward value-based care, the radiology industry is, in a way, sacrificing today’s monetary gains for a better tomorrow. It’s a smart, impressively noble move, but one that hasn’t been easy—and likely won’t get much easier in the immediate future.