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Policy

 

Health-policy educator and researcher Patricia (“Polly”) Pittman, PhD, co-founded the GW Health Workforce Institute at George Washington University (GWHWI) in April 2015.

Practice leaders are aware that the Affordable Care Act requires repayment of an overpayment within 60 days of identifying it and that retaining an overpayment may result in significant penalties under the False Claims Act.

Radiographs of the ankle, hip and knee getting coded as mammograms; a popular code-assist product failing right out of the gate and remaining troublesome months later; small billing companies shuttering their offices, leaving physician practices without any billing services at all. These are some of the scenarios reported in the wake of the Oct. 1, 2015, launch of the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10).

Countless healthcare providers of every type heaved a sigh of relief when CMS announced a one-year grace period following the Oct. 1, 2015, launch of ICD-10.

How do you lead change—even when you’re not in charge? The answer to that question is both simpler and subtler than one might think, and it’s readily applicable to radiologists, radiology business managers, radiology technologists and everyone else within the sphere of medical imaging.

 

Recent Headlines

GW Health Workforce Institute: Nonlicensed and tele-health savvy health workers to shape future healthcare staffing needs

Health-policy educator and researcher Patricia (“Polly”) Pittman, PhD, co-founded the GW Health Workforce Institute at George Washington University (GWHWI) in April 2015.

CMS answers key question around Medicare overpayment refund obligations

Practice leaders are aware that the Affordable Care Act requires repayment of an overpayment within 60 days of identifying it and that retaining an overpayment may result in significant penalties under the False Claims Act.

MedData’s CEO Barnes: ICD-10 will be a big-data journey

Radiographs of the ankle, hip and knee getting coded as mammograms; a popular code-assist product failing right out of the gate and remaining troublesome months later; small billing companies shuttering their offices, leaving physician practices without any billing services at all. These are some of the scenarios reported in the wake of the Oct. 1, 2015, launch of the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10).

Mounting an informed, intelligent transition to ICD-10

Countless healthcare providers of every type heaved a sigh of relief when CMS announced a one-year grace period following the Oct. 1, 2015, launch of ICD-10.

Frank Lexa, MD, MBA: 5 steps to successful change management

How do you lead change—even when you’re not in charge? The answer to that question is both simpler and subtler than one might think, and it’s readily applicable to radiologists, radiology business managers, radiology technologists and everyone else within the sphere of medical imaging.

ICD-10 is finally happening

There were multiple delays. There were conflicting survey results on whether healthcare organizations were adequately prepared. There was end-to-end testing, guidance, tools and much debate.

Will Connecticut fix its budget woes on the backs of radiology patients?

Earlier this year, Connecticut cut Medicaid reimbursement rates for OB-GYN and radiology. In June, the Nutmeg State’s general assembly voted to restore the former in large part but the latter barely at all. Some say the radiology cut—$4.45 million, a whopping 42.5%—will block access to care for many patients who need it most.

Vermont tests elimination of payer pre-approvals for MRIs

The Green Mountain State is in the news for more than the entry of Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders into the 2016 race for president. A pilot healthcare-delivery project there experiments with removing a rule currently requiring patients to get pre-approval from their health plans for MRIs. 

Health-policy docs issue call to action against physician self-referral

There are two schools of thought on physician self-referral. On one side are supporters who see the practice as a harmless means of streamlining care for patients. On the other are detractors who consider it a cynical form of capitalism run amok in healthcare.

Tucking into 2015 to-do list, MITA hires new policy director and takes aim at tax repeal—for starters

“The repeal of the medical device tax is our number one priority for 2015. We are really hoping this is the year we see it repealed.”

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