Care Delivery

The past several years have seen the development of a de facto stealth campaign against screening mammography. “Vast Study Casts Doubts on Value of Mammograms,” the New York Times bullhorned in 2014. “Why Getting a Mammogram May Cause More Trouble Than It’s Worth,” a Prevention headline blared in 2016. “It’s Time to End Mammograms, Some Experts Say,” trumpeted Time this past December. All of this is fueled, of course, by the never-ending disputes over guidelines issued by numerous authoritative groups.
Once considered some of the most contractually stable and fiscally secure practitioners in all of U.S. medicine, radiologists are today concerned about their very future—and more than a few are right to be worried. From nosediving reimbursement to successive consolidation, from constantly expanding technologies to fitfully pinballing policymaking, the pressures have been varied and unrelenting for years now. What’s more, the pace of change is even now only accelerating. How best to rise to this moment with realistic hopes of emerging stronger than ever?
Radiologist Marc Liebeskind, MD, doesn’t need to strain his memory to recall a time when he saw a health insurer’s authorization process come between sound clinical judgment and a patient’s clearly indicated care.
Emergency departments (EDs) are busier than ever, and ED imaging volumes are up almost across the board.
Modern cancer care urgently demands new approaches. Lives are at risk, and an ever increasing number of cancer patients and complex examinations constitute more of the radiologist’s workload than ever before.
With a single-vendor CT fleet many years in service, Savannah, Ga.-based St. Joseph’s/Candler (SJ/C) health system was a model of customer loyalty.
Any distributed workflow solution worth its salt helps radiologists work at the top of their clinical skill set, maximize their productivity and fully integrate their workflow with that of the rest of their practice—and, ultimately, with the workflow of the ordering physician, practice or provider organization.
Taking a deep dive into the data generated by a practice can offer a roadmap, of sorts, to help find opportunities for value. A couple of recent top stories showcased two innovative ways to look at information that could help improve practice.
As the U.S. shifts further into the era of accountable care, hitting quality benchmarks becomes ever more important. Reimbursement is increasingly tied to the value generated by providers, and data about who is making the grade is becoming more transparent.
Here’s a riddle: If every imaging interpretation is labeled stat, are any of them truly stat?
When Keyur Sathe, MHA, decided to put his nearly two decades of healthcare leadership and entrepreneurialism to work in a bold new venture—one that would, in his words, help “bend the arc of healthcare” toward greater value—he didn’t have to look far for inspiration.