Technology Management

Imagine trying to find a white rabbit in a field of snow. This scenario is similar to what radiologists go through when looking for tumors in a woman with dense breasts, as both normal fibroglandular tissue and abnormal masses appear white on a mammogram.

Leaders in imaging, and all other healthcare specialties, should pay close attention to survey results published by Black Book Market Research earlier this month. The numbers raise red flags about the current state of technology in healthcare, and there are some important lessons to be learned.

If you’ve ever booked a trip online using a site such as Kayak or Expedia, you’ve seen something of the future of healthcare computing.

Intensifying pressure to meet accreditation competencies. Heated calls from consumer groups for absolute transparency in medical costing and decision-making. The exploding displacement of fee-for-service by riskier, ever-more-frugal payment models. It’s enough to chase a modern medical student into another line of work.

Wearing 3-D glasses and brandishing styluses, students at a small medical school are dissecting holograms of virtual body systems in ways they can’t when using actual human cadavers.

NASA doesn’t send astronauts into space until they’ve logged a certain number of hours in capsule simulators equipped with full control panels. The day may be coming when hospitals won’t send neurosurgeons into the OR until they’ve honed their skills in brain surgery simulators outfitted with diffusion tensor MRI.

The average price healthcare providers are paying to acquire CT systems has dropped by 20.9 percent since this time last year.

Fujifilm’s acquisition of TeraMedica, the 14-year-old, Milwaukee-based developer of vendor-neutral archive (VNA) products and services, has sent a formidable new vendor entity—Fujifilm TeraMedica Inc.—straight to the head of the VNA class. Few healthcare-technology watchers would deny as much. 

Healthcare provider organizations working out interoperability strategies must include medical imaging in their tactical initiatives. 

Hospital CIOs now recognize that it’s no longer a question of whether vendor neutral archive (VNA) is a technology they should consider, but rather when is the right time to introduce VNA to their IT organization.

Medical IT and technology company Sectra has announced its acquisition of it-mark, a Danish company specializing in cloud services to the business and healthcare sectors.

Perception: The dose wars and the slice wars are so five years ago, and imaging equipment isn’t where the action is anymore, anyway. Everyone is extending life cycles until scanners are about driven into the ground. You want action in radiology? Look to big data, analytics, informatics and other “wonders-of-computing” spheres.